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light to drill for oil. >> the u.n. says the long drawn out battle between government troops and rebels in the democratic republic of congo is drawing to a close. congolese soldiers are launching an assault to retake the last town held by armed fighters known as the m23 rebels. a bit of background. the m23 are a group of tute si fighters who defected from the government. the conflicts forced 800,000 people to flee their homes. the push by the congolese troops has been largely successful because they are backed by a u.n. prevention brigade sent to crush the rebels. the m23 fighters abandoned their military positions in the east and are confined to a small down close to the ugandan border called rumanagabo. >> they have been fighting hard for days. they are getting ready to fight again. they are congolese government troops and have taken a string of towns back from the m23 rebels. the fighters hold a town on the ugandan border, a few kilometres from here. the congolese tanks are getting ready for what the army says is a final push against the m23 rebels. the morale is high. they've had se
production equipment, according to a report from the international chemical weapons watchdog. the u.n. is satisfied declared production - mixing and filling equipment - has been eliminated. live to istanbul. omar al saleh has more on this from istanbul. this coming ahead of a deadline set by the u.n. >> yes, that's true. basically it says that syria did need that deadline. now the opcw said that its inspectors visited 21 sites out of the 23 sites declared by syria. it said the other two sites were too dangerous to visit, but they were confident and satisfied with the removal of the equipment and it was brought to the inspectors and they oversaw the destruction of aerial bombs, war heads, as well as all the mixing and filling equipment. now this brings us to the end of phase one, and two, which was meant to end by november 1st. after november 1st it will be the start of the more important phase and it's phase 3. that phase will last until the end of june next year and involves the u.n. mission support to monitor, verify all the destruction complex weapons which is estimated to be aroun
before fighting in the democratic republic of congo killed a u.n. peace keeper. the congolese army says it's taken over a number of towns from the m23. the rebels retreated to the rwandan border. they have threatened to pull out of peace talks in you ganda. >> three people have been killed in china's tiananmen square. a car crashed into pedestrians and into the crowd. several people, including a police officer, have been injured. the square has been evacuated. >> at least 21, 2.1 million syrian refugees in neighbouring countries are registered with the u.n. or awaiting registration. in syria the arabic groups are to arrive in damascus for talks, to meet the president and foreign minister. lakhdar brahimi is trying to build support for peace talks planned for geneva next month. the main rebel groups refused to take part. >> lakhdar brahimi's visit to damascus is part of a regional tour. he's visited iraq, egypt, kuwait, imam and kata and met the king of jordan in a country that hosts over half a million syrian refugees. on thursday he held talks with leaders of the free syrian army and o
of shooting hostages. we get the army's response to the allegations. >>> al jazerra obtains the first u.n. report on the destruction of syria's chemical weapons. we'll tell you what's in it. >> reporter: and i'll be reporting on how swarms of locust have eaten crops across 70% of madagascar and a new plan to kill them. ♪ ♪ >>> u.s. press barack obama has ordered a review of the national security agency intelligence operations acknowledge that go more constraints are needing. obama is being fiercely criticized over allegations the national security agency tapped german chancellor angela merkel's phone and snoop odd other european allies. white house spokesman jay karen said it would look to to the concerns of other country. here are the details. >> reporter: at the white house, the presidential spokesman refused to be drawn on the reports that the u.s. tracked millions of spanish foal calls but reported the nsa surveillance programs are being examined. >> we are conducting a review. we are mindful that some of these disclosure have his caused tension in our relationships. with new capa
and the chemical programs and how it plans to destroy it on time to the u.n. inspectors, so on one hand the syrian government feels at the moment we are satisfying the international community mainly the u.s. and russia and on the other side maybe at this particular moment we can still hold some ground. >> reporter: thanks for joining us from beirut. international inspectors completed the first phase of the mission to destroy syria's chemical weapons and say the government submitted a detailed plan to eliminate the stockpile. damascus allowed access to site and the plan is to destroy chemical weapons by the middle of next year. an explosion of gaza after an air strike and no injuries reported and israel said it targeted two hidden rocket launchers and it's a response of rockets fired from gaza early monday. early results in the presidential election said the ally and prime minister is headed for a big win and he has more than 62% of the votes and 90% counted and we report. >> celebrations to mark the end of aer roo and be be -- beginning of a new style of government in georgia and he will take the
-term elections killing off hopes of a third term. [gunfire] emergency talks with the u.n. after renewed fighting between government forces and m 23 rebels in the eastern democratic part of congo. they pray for a return home 65 years after being forced out. ♪ the u.n. arab league arrived for talks with the syrian government planned in geneva next month and he has been touring the region in the past week talking to all sides involved in the conflict and been to countries that support it like turkey and kanta and talks with groups against fighting with the government and met iran's new president who is a supporter in the region telling him the country's presence is vital for the geneva talks to succeed. and let's bring bill joining us live from beirut and i understand he drove from beirut to damascus and he is there, what is he going to do? >> well, he is due to meet with the syrian president bashir assad and foreign minister and this will be a very difficult mission, as difficult as it was in the past simply because the positions on either side have not changed much. the opposition still says it
targeted for several high profile hacking attempts in the united states. >>> u.n. inspectors missed an important deadline in dismantling syria's quepts program, they were unable to reach two of the 23 locations because of security reasons. they are currently destroying equipment used to manufacture the weapons. the inspectors didn't say exactly the if syrian rebels or the government were responsible, just that they are still negotiating access. the syrian government has agreed to destroy or remove its entire stockpile by 2014. the first report contains new details about the extent of the country's chemical weapons program based on information the syrian government provided to the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons. syria says it has 24 facilities at 23 locations around the country. 2.3 million pounds, 230 unfilled chemical bombs in stork storming. syria has agreed to remove all of this by mid 2014, william butler is a former weapons inspector in iraq. ambassador good to see you. >> good to see you john. >> you've read this report, what stands out to you? >> what st
. congo and the u.n. have consistently accused rwanda and uganda of supporting the rebels, although both of those countries deny it. in the recent days in the fighting when the m 23, it looks like they haven't been getting much support at all because the congolese army has just taken one town after the next. it was originally quite some heavy fighting, but it looks like the m 23 just got weaker and weaker. as we move forward today with government soldiers several times we came under fire but it was only fire of light weapons and m 23 was armed to the teeth with mortars and rockets. today they didn't have any of those kinds of weapons left, it seems. just some rifles and machine guns. >> to syria now where the red cross has brokered a deal to allow some people to leave a besieged suburb. the area is surrounded by government forces and thousands face starvation. the u.n. said there are still a million people trapped without aid across the country. >> reporter: this is a rare movement of relief and cooperation between regime forces, rebel groups and aid workers. some 1800 syrians have been
program reauthorised. james b. comey is the 7th director of the federal bureau of investigation. >> the u.n.'s special envoy to syria is in damascus on his latest round of diplomacy, trying to bring together all sides in the conflict to peace talks in geneva. rob matheson has the story. >> many called it a near impossible task - a return to damascus to muster some or, indeed, any enthusiasm for talks finding a way out of syria's crisis. it's not just a matter of getting two sides to the table. before that he has to try to knit together a fractured rebel opposition - much of which doesn't want to be involved. >> translation: the international community wants to support the syrian regime in geneva, they don't want to weaken them. that's why we reject the conference. when we see promises toppling the assad reej aim leading to an -- regime leading to an international court, then yes we will negotiate it. first there needs to be a statement. in the absence of political solution the military solution is the only one on the table. >> elsewhere in syria the deadline for destroying equipment used t
continues. . >>> welcome back, you are watching al jazeera. the top stories: the u.n. says a threat from the m23 movement in the democratic republic of congo is almost over. government troops are trying to retake the last town in the east of the country that is held by rebels. >> another senior leader of the muslim brotherhood has been arrested in egypt. an interior ministerry source says esam el-arian was taken from a house in a cairo suburb where he'd been hiding >> a bus crashed and doubt fire between bangalore and hyderabad in india. 44 dead, six passengers and the driver made it out alive. >> at the u.n. backed khmer rouge trial in cam bodia, it's in the final stages of a trial of the two most senior leaders arrived. the men are accused of crimes against humanity. the court is looking into the removal of people from the capital 40 years ago. let's go to al jazeera's correspondent following the trial in pyongyang. what has been happening in court today? >> well, this is a second-last day of final statements from both sides, we heard from prosecution lawyers and lawyers for the civil
the u.n. arrob league tells the opposition they have to attend a peace conference. ♪ hello, i'm adrian and this is al jazeera live from doha and a power crisis in gaza as the territory runs out of fuel, the search for millions of missing people around the world and the discovery of what could be the largest masked grave from the bosnian war. >> get off my driveway. >> the mayor of the city under pressure under a crack smoking video. ♪ in the past couple hours the u.n. arab league told the opposition what it must attend peace talks in switzerland and they are trying to build a framework for negotiations to end the fighting and involving rebel fighters and politicians is difficult and the comments are a day after reports of an israeli air strike on a weapons basin side syria. >> i'm going to meet representatives from russia and the united states in what we call the tri-lateral and we have been working together for quite some time now. and i think that probably in the afternoon or the second day, the representatives of the rest of the p 5 will join us and other countries. there
's largest u.n. peacekeeping forces in congo have been helping the government fight m23. the u.n. has not managed to stop atrocities in the 14 years it's been here, but will find out what happened. >> we all know that bodies have been found in the area. the area has been controlled by m23 for a year, and it has been taken by the army a few days ago. on the u.n. side we form a team which will investigate. from the results we'll tell you what was discovered. >> the government says it's investigating too. but war crimes are common in congo's conflict. the full story may never beuncovered. >>> two men have been sentenced to death in absentia for war crimes committed during bangladesh's war of independence. they've been found guilty by a tribunal for the murder of a dozen intellectuals in 1971. one of the mean, chowdhury mueen-uddin, is a prominent muslim leader living in the u.k. he fled after the 9-month war. the other defendant, ashrafuz zaman khan lives in the united states. joining us from london via skype is a man whose father was abducted and killed during the 1971 war. thank you fo
peacekeeping forces have been helping the government fight m23. the u.n. has not managed to stop atrocities. they'll find out what happened. >> translation: we know that bodies have been found in the area. it has been controlled by the m23 for one year, and he has been taken by the army a few days ago. >> on the u.n. side we are forming a team. from the results we'll tell you what we discovered. >> the government says it's investigating too. war crimes are common in congo's conflict. the full story may never be uncovered. . >>> in northern yemen more heavy fighting a being reported as shia muslim rebels attack a stronghold. a tribal leader says 100 people have been killed in fighting around damaj. ambulances can't get to the town to treat civilian casualties. we have this report from sanneh. >> this is the only video we have of the latest fighting in the town of damaj. it's a stronghold for muslim conservatives - the salafi. they have been shelled by shia houthi rebels. the houthi say it's home to religious conservative parties. >> translation: these are foreign extreme its who consider us
're covering in detail in the next 60 minutes. the u.n.-syrian envoy arrives in damascus. >>> argentina's president loses ground midterm elections killing off her hopes of a third term in office. >>> demanding answers and e.u. delegation heads to washington on claims that the u.s. spied on leaders. >>> no planes, trains or angels. the crippling the u.s. transport system. >> we begin with syria and this number. 2,100,000. that is the total number of people, individuals, that the u.n.est hates has now fled syria because of war. that's on top of the 5 million who have been displaced but still within syria's borders. well, that figure comes as the latest diplomacies as they try tto drum up another round of talks. we're live from neighboring beirut. take us through what they're hoping to achieve. all right, i don't know if you can hear me. i hope you can. now in da mas damascus. what do me hope to achieve. >> reporter: more than anything he wants to hear from the syrian government what it would take for the syrian government to attend a geneva conference. he has been shuffling around the reg
, by not takingun of the non-permanent seat did on the u.n. security council. and, two, by deciding to not take part in certain diplomatic and military operations with the u.s. where these things would normally happen otherwise. so this is a chance for saudis to express concerns to kerry, not just about syria but also about iran. the saudis are very concerned about the iranians trying to assume a greater role in regional politics, and it doesn't want to be pushed out. so kerry has to go with listening to these concerns, trying to placate the saudis as best he can. >>> in syria, government forces tried to quell much government controlled areas. assad's regime has tried to secure that area from months. video shows thick smoke. al jazeera cannot verify these videos. more than 100,000 people have been killed since that war began two and a half years ago. >>> meanwhile, another area of syria, a giant bronze statue of jesus has managed to end the violence, albeit briefly. government forces and reynolds stopped fighting for three days so the 40 foot statute could be erected. a london based foundation has b
say the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapon sites. the head of the opcw u.n. team said that the country has been cooperative. >> we have had good meetings with the syrian government, there's continued strong cooperation with the secretary-general and the director of opcw. we build on this. we have one shared goal - the elimination of the program, which is of benefit to all and the syrian people. >> not all are convinced, as evidenced on abc's "this week", in syria the chemical weapons are catalogued, inspectors are in there finding and putting a stop to the program. >> we'll see. i'm a sceptic, like a lot of others are. i know friends in the region are worried. >> syria is believed to possess around 1,000 met rig tonnes of chemical weapons, including mustard gas and sarin, which they denied for years. they deny any involvement in the august 21st chemical weapons attack that killed 1,400 people there. under threat of u.s. military action rush abrokered a deal with the united states for sir why to destroy their stockpiles. it is complicated and it's not decided how or whe
, the nerve agent, and mustard gas. the interesting bit of this is that the u.n. or the opcw have no mandate to carry out the destruction and, therefore, it's highly probable that a u.n. member state will have to provide technical and operational assistance in destroying that. >> that being the case, there's always been this concern that the opcw won't be able to meet the deadlines to destroy all the chemical weapons. given that they have met this deadline, are they optimistic to meet the next few deadlines? >> yes, well, when you spoke to the officials from the opcw, they will say they are very optimistic about the phase that is completed - 1 and 2. if you remember the secretary-general of the united nations, when he was outlining the whole plan for the joint u.n.-opcw, he said the most challenging part is phase 3. that is the coming phase, if you will - destroying the stockpile. we have to remember all of this is based on what the syrian government declared. now, we don't know if the opcw has its own information that contradicts what syria declared - that's one. and probably there will be
documents about the n.s.a., including information that the u.s. has spied on allies. if he returns to the u.s. he faces charges of espionage. he is in russia where he was granted asylum. >> a gunman involved in the killing at los angeles international airport talked to police. he told them he acted alone, the admission coming after he was shot by officers. he killed a t.s.a. employee and injured three others. the 23-year-old is facing murder charges and the death penalty. he's in critical condition and under 24 hour armed surveillance. >> an alabama airport is being reopened after a bomb threat. officials at birmingham-shuttlesworth international airport say they found a note warning of a pom in the main terminal -- of a bomb in the main terminal and called the federal bureau of investigation. after a sweep the airport was cleared. it was up and running two hours later. a dozen flight were delayed or diverted. passengers were briefly evacuated during the shutdown. >> while colder air is coming out of canada, into the united states we have wet, warm weather coming up into texas from the sout
a video said to show him smoking crack cocaine. >> joining us for a developing story out of syria, where u.n. arab league lakhdar brahimi has been speaking. he has been talking about efforts to end the war there, and plans for a conference in geneva. >> i am going meet representatives from russia and united states, our partners in the trilateral format - we have been working together for quite some time now. i think probably in the afternoon or the second day representatives of the rest of the p5 will join us and maybe other countries. there are some very, very serious efforts being developed everywhere to try and make this conference possible. but, you know, we will say it's happened only when it happens. >> that was lakhdar brahimi speaking a few moments ago in damascus. let's get some comment from our correspondent hoda who is in lebanon. >> as lakhdar brahimi tries to get all parties to sign up to the geneva ii conference, he says the syrian people continue to suffer. as many as a third of them are directly caught up in the conflict. >> he said the solution was more urgents now than neve
france was listening to her calls in the late 1990s. she was at the u.n. when a french ambassador asked her about something she said during a private call with someone else. she said, "this is not a surprise, countries spy on each other." >> 60 are dead after a wave of bombings across iraq, striking shi item areas, and sold years in mosul. there were more than 10 blasts. the attacks were the latest in a surge of blasts, more than 5,000 this year. >> syria met a deadline as it works to remove chemical weapons arsenal, in line with an agreement to eliminate all weapons by mid-2014. kilmeny duchardt has more. >> syria is reportedly meeting an ambitious deadline set by the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons, otherwise known as opcw, to destroy lethal stockpiles by next year. syria handed over details of poison gas and nerve agent programs on thursday, ahead of the october 27th deadline. opcw is not releasing the report, but the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapons' sites. the head. opcw un team said the country has been cooperative. >> we had good meetings with
as possible. and as quick as possible. >> the u.n. backed mayor in cam bodia is in the final stage of a trial of the two most senior leaders arrived. the two men are accused of war crimes. we go to phonm penh. >> a city of 2 million emptied in less than a day. it's normally busy streets quite. 17 april 1975 marked the start of a reign of terror for many cam bodians. that mark khmer rouge soldiers marched into the city as victors. the people of phonm penh welcomed them, happy that a 5-year civil war was over. hours later they were all ordered to leave for the country side. this man was lying in phonm penh at the time. >> we were told the americans were planning to bomb the city. the soldiers told us we'd return in a few days. >> he was forced to march for a week with his family. his 3-year-old son didn't survive the journey. like others, he died from disease and starvation. the khmer rouge was trying to create a rural utopia. the 4-year reign would kill intellectuals, teachers - anyone accused of being a spy. this was a french photographer in phonm penh the day it fell. he never imagined the e
beat people and arrest people and make them disappear. >> the world's largest u.n. peace-keeping forces in democratic republic of congo have been helping the government fight m23. the u.n. hasn't managed to stop atrocities in the 14 years since it's been here. they'll find out what happened. >> we know that bodies have been found in that area. the area has been controlled by m23 for one year, and has been taken by the army a few days ago. we are quickly forming a team which is going to vet. from the results we'll tell you what was discovered. >> the government says it's investigating too. war crimes are common in congo's conflict. the full story may never be uncovered. >> a stampede in eastern nigeria left 17 people dead and dozens injured. it happened after an overnight church vigil. it's not known what caused the stampede. the state governor said an inquiry will investigate what happened. >> french ministers are holding a meeting in response to the murder of two french journalists killings mali's government has condemned the killings. >> in northern yemen more heavy fighting is being
. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. >> the head of the n.s.a. defiantly defending the spy agency. the general says gathering intelligence around the world is critical and helps to keep america safe from terrorists. >> the war raging in syria claiming some surprising new victims. children are being diagnosed with polio because they don't have access to adequate health care. >> it is reported that at 8:58 p.m., a huge object believing to be a meteor right fell on a farm. >> 75 years ago, martians innovated the planet or people listening to the radio thought they did. a look back at the war of the world broadcast that caused widespread panic across the country. >> good morning. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> good to have you with us on this wednesday. two hours from now, the health and human services secretary will testify. >> many are saying she should be fired. >> kathleen see bellous will be asked to explain the failure of the health care website. we have more on what she might say today. >> good morning. you know, kathl
almost all based on information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggest the u.s. has been spying on many countries and their leaders, including important u.s. allies. >> the white house denies the report that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel. we have the latest. >> a nine member delegation will meet with senior government officials over allegations of widespread spying against leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. according to the wall street journal, the president was unaware the n.s.a. was spying on world leaders and ordered the agency to stop some of the monitoring programs after learning of them. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who are upset. over the weekend, thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> some memb
from the u.n. general assembly calling for right to privacy on the internet. a draft could be circulated later this week. i talked to al jazeera's national security advisory faisa patel. >> there is embarrassment right now, the socialist government is way, way down in the polls. so the notion that the french government has no control over its destiny that it can't protect itself even against american spying doesn't play well with the elect ral rat. >> faisa do they have a right to be outraged? >> i think so. you have to put this in the context of, parting of ways between europe and the united states, the drone issue being another one just last week, in the u.n. general assembly, there was a big debate about drones and there you had many european countries joining with third world countries to express concern about drones. i think there's also this general sense that maybe the americans have just gone too far in their quest for security and i think that's also part of the equation here. >> but when it comes to the spying how does that rank on the evils of the united states?
joins us from the u.n. help me sort through the issues. the chemical weapons inspectors finished the first phase of the job. what comes next? >> well, they did this ahead of schedule, they had a deadline for 1 november to stop all the production facilities of chemical weapons, and make it impossible for syria to produce any more chemical weapons. that has been done. i think the - those involved, the u.n. and the organisation for the prohibition of chemical weapons believe it really has been done, and they are happy. in many ways that is the easy part, tony. the more difficult part is all of those chemical weapons that they have. that is 1,000 metric tonnes of chemical weapons - war heads, munitio munitions, sarin, mustard gas - they have to find a way of getting the munitions and probably taking them out of syria and destroying them. the problem at the moment is they don't have a country that wants to do that job, that wants to host the deconstruction, destruction of the chemical weapons. >> so, james, look, we have a situation here - there was a lot of testimony on krill about s
reign down on the u.n. syria envoy says opposition and government must be represented at peace talks. first thailand's lower house part of the amnesty bill that may give the prime minister a way back and. >> can you get off my driveway? can you please get off my driveway? >> reporter: toronto mayor under pressure with a video showing him smoking crack cocaine. >> no reason to resign. ♪ we begin with an exclusive report from mali, a poor country in west africa that in the past year have seen fighters and rebels, right now in the capitol politicians are beginning talks on how to stabilize the north, but that maybe a vain hope and rebels tell us they will resume attacks on the army if it continues what it calls ethnic cleansing in an area they hope to turn into an independent state. our reporter mohamed went to meet them. >> it's a source of deep anger among the rebels. civilians crossing the border almost every week with wounds and stories of killing by the mali army. they tell al jazeera how they spent days in chains being beaten and verbally abused. they say soldiers arrested them
at the white house today. the meeting came on the heels of a u.n. report that said that nearly a thousand iraqis died during violence in october. let's go to mike viqueira at the white house, mike, tell us about that meeting today. what was the prime minister asking for? >> reporter: well, he's asking for weapons. he's asking for american weapons systems to fight the violence that he and the white house lay squarely at the feet of taliban. there are some who say no,al maliki is response as well involving the sunniy shiite and kurd violence. more than 7,000 iraqi versus died in violence over the course of this year alone, that's an estimated figure. al maliki asked for weapons systems to help. >> throughout this discussion the main theme was tha theme wai communicated to the prime minister that anything that we can do to help bring about that more hopeful future for iraq is something that we want to work on. welcome, mr. prime minister, thank you so much for coming. >> the white house saying again today which should be clear to everyone there is going to be no more american troops on the g
people for nothing and arrest people and make them disappear. >> the world's largest u.n. peacekeeping forces - they have been helping the government fight m23. the u.n. hasn't managed to stop atrocities in the 14 years since it's been here, but will find out what happened. >> translation: we know that bodies have been found in the area. the area had been controlled by m23 and has been taken by the army a few days ago. on the u.n. side we are forming a team that will investigate. from the results we'll tell you what we discovered. >> the government says it's investigating, but war crimes are common. the full story may not be uncovered. >> the suspect in friday's shooting at los angeles international airport was able to answer critical questions after he was shot. law enforcement officials said paul ciancia said a friend dropped him at the airport, but he acted alone. paul ciancia killed a t.s.a. employee and four others. >> older americans are against proposals that would cut social security benefits. 60% of americans 50 and older do not want the government to change how it determines
keeping the u.s.a. safe. >> that might be the way that the n.s.a. has skirted around these issues, because they are in lock step with g.c.h.q. they worked well in hand, the two of them. there are an awful lot of monitoring stations here in the u.k., one run by the n.s.a. itself up in yorkshire. it's said to be the largest facility in minwith hill, the largest in europe. the g.c.h.q. and n.s.a. work hand-in-glove together and have a special relationship and share intelligence, so maybe it's not the n.s.a. monitoring american citizens, maybe it's the g.c.h.q. and they can do it under british law, so a little bit of a roundabout way of doing things, phil. >> again, phil ittner joining us from london on these exclusive documents obtained by aljazeera. >> edward snowden has a new job, his lawyer said he has found a tech support job. he has been living in the former soviet republic since august. the lawyer didn't name the company. he is set to start tomorrow. >> if you're getting one of these letters, just shop around in the new marketplace. you're going to get a better deal. >> president obama
's director is denying the allegations. a diplomatic push is underway to end the war in syria. a u.n. special representative meets with ser vinnie president in an attempt to get him to participate in peace talks. >>> the red sox are world champions. >> for the first time in more than 90 years the boston red sox win the world series in front of the hometown faithful at fenway. ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to al jazerra america, i am stephanie sy. nearly a month after the roll out the government's health care website is still causing headaches for people who are unable to sign up for coverage. president obama is on the defensive and his health secretary has apologized, mike sresreuviqueira is in washingtoh the story. >> reporter: the website launch was called a did he back the. but the president went on offense defending the new health care law and drawing parallels with another high-profile launch that had its share of problems. before there was obama care, there was romney care. the massachusetts law that was a model for the affordable care act, visiting boston, president obama says the comparison sti
threatened to veto any resolution authorizing force at the u.n. security council, military action seemed any further off. >> the security council has to be brought in. >> reporter: stepping back a bit. obama decided to ask congress to approve the use of military force against syria. but that plan changed when, in september, u.s. secretary of state john kerry made an off the cuff comment saying if syria gave up its chemical weapons then military action could be avoided. something the russians jumped at and that led to a plan to eliminate syria's chemical weapons. based on that agreement, the global chemical weapons watchdog set deadlines for syria's disarmer. and sent weapons inspectors in. syria has now met two deadlines in that process. last week the syrian government submitted a plan outlining how it will destroy its chemical weapons reserves. on thursday, a day before the deadline, it's a announced that syria has functionally destroyed the equipment it needs to create new chemical weapons. the next deadline is the middle of this month with syria's formal plan will need to be approved by t
a crucial deadline. >> the next deadline is just a few weeks away. a former u.n. weapons investigator tells us about the challenges facing the syrian team. >> the vatican sends out a worldwide survey, catholic bishops polled on issues such as bird control and gay marriage. >> salmon are booming in numbers that haven't been seen in a century. how people have stepped in to help this once-threatened species. >> shock in the nfl's thursday night football game. the locally dolphins managed to upend the division leader, all up next in sports. (vo) tonight ... >> does the nsa collect any type of data on millions of americans? >> no sir. (vo) fault lines investigates what it's like to live under the watchful eye of the nsa. >> they know everything that you do, everything that you think, everything that you fear. they know how to manipulate and control you. the state has all the power. >> we have done more to destroy our way of life than the terrorists could ever have done. >> a senator under investigation and only al jazeera america is there. uncovering the corruption opening the files... >> are yo
ay! . ♪ (mÚsica) ♪ >>> hoyos a ver en quiÉ se re encarnan en este hotde. u n d. (suena telÉfo). > hot transilvania bueno dÍas. diga, no moleste. (suena telÉfono). >>> mi vida, ay! apaga ese timbre tÚ que no lo estoy oyendo demasiado >>> quiÉn habla >>> no me conoces niurkmarcos >>> en este mismo momento, en este mismo momento estamos llenos >>> chacto cesito, nosotrosomos la reencarnaÓn de un "un nuevoÍa" >>> niurka > sÍ mi vida niurka marcos >>> carn sinas >>> que pasÓ mamacita >>> no >>> vengo por esto. voy arrastrar el pel suelto. >>> sÍ sÉ, he. aÍ me preran la suite presidencial p favor. >>> que no. >>> sÍ. >>> venimos a triunf. >>> no entiendo de verdad que toda esta gente, me deron que esba sola y vacÍo >>> yooy elol de mÉxico y tÚ. >>> y la esidencial. >>> se v a caer eso. ese sÍ s ve bienuena nda >>> n te cae la ealer papi >> quÉ pasÓ carnal >>> quÉ hubo, no marches >>> oye luis mi, mi vida esta duro aquÍ >>> tÚ eres u dlas pocasue fal >>> no papeso no me gusta me gusta esaos >>> is mue estas perdido look >>> hasta el pel estoy pend
are on the u.n. sanctions list. those who surrendered said they don't want to fight any more and they wanting to back to civilian life or join the congolese army. but it seems that they may be willing to sign a deal that gives any kind of amnesty to the leaders. >> malcolm webb reporting from the congo military base. >>> closing migrant camps, the government decided to do so after 92 people died of thirst trying to cross the sahara desert. officials also promise to severely punish the traffickers who move people through to m nir or libya. >>> in an interview recorded a few weeks, al jazeera has obtained a copy of the recording that was never made public. egypt's constitution was suspended after the president mohammed morsi was deposed. >> the military institution should be given immunity for the role it has played. it is not an immune for fatah, it is for the institution. and the coming constitution should consider that. the institution should be protected in the constitution for the next 15 years with standing who is going to be in power whether he's islamist. >> a satire show pulled off the
to an . they have made their pleasure known. one by not taking one of the permanent seats on the u.n. security council and deciding not to take part in certain diplomatic and military operations with the u.s. where these things would happen otherwise. this is a chance for the saudis to express their concerns to kerry not just about syria, but also about iran. the saudis are concerned about iranians assuming a greater role in politics. kerry has to listen to these concerns and try to placate the saudis the best he can. >> the first time since egyptian president morsi was doug deposed pictures of him emerge. they are believed to have been filmed secretly in july. >> morsi is to stand trial in a few hours about murder and violence. >> it means a strike against the constitution, this issue violates all of the basics of state institutions. >> we are in cairo with more on that. the egyptian newspapers editor says this was the first of many clips to be ro research releasee coming days. more citmorsi's trial starts ony and the following days. in these clips we believe he will talk about all sorts of m
. >> that was david shuster. >> u.n. officials confirmed an outbreak of polio, the first time the disease was seen in a decade. there were 10 confirmed polio cases. 12 are being investigated. most tested are babies and toddlers. the disease will spread among half a million children who have not been vaccinated. members of congress heard from victims of a drone strike of the the pakistani family appeared on capitol hill to talk about the attack that left the family matery ark dead. kimberley halket has the story. >> they travelled from north waziristan to the u.s. congress in washington d.c. the goal - to tell americans what happened when a u.s. drone targeted a pakistani family. it was a year ago when zubair rehnan was struck by shrapnel. he was gathering vegables to prepare for an east of eid >> translation: i could see the drone hovering, why would i worry, neither my grandmother or i were militants. when it fired, the ground shook. >> shrapnel from the second drone hit nabila, his sister, later. as she ran she heard the grandmother, the village witch doctor screaming. >> no one told me why my
, council of europe, the u.n. and they keep doing it. there hasn't been no political way to address the demands of romas. >> reporter: the city councilor in rome said she wants to end segregation through integration. >> we need to learn to live together. their reputation as kno momads e observe sow least. >> keep calling this camp home. >> the pope who makes a new friend. check him out. he just won't leave his side. to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >> returning to our top story health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius just wrapped up her testimony on capitol hill. she was answering questions about problems with the healthcare exc
, of course, would contradict the foreign office statement to the u.n. ben emerson, that hundreds were kill. he was later told that that figure was an underestimate, that the casualty figure was in the thousands. the report is seen as highly contradictory because there have been a number of attacks. casualties are confirmed to be civilians. 80 civilians were killed at a funeral procession in 2009. over 40 tribal chief taps were killed -- chief tans were killed in another attack. reports are contradictory, and likely to raise eyebrows. >> people in afghanistan still have several months to go until polling day. already there are concerns about election fraud. the last presidential vote was marred by widespread corruption. al jazeera uncovered evidence that next year's election could be compromised. jennifer glass reports. >> what you are looking at are counterfeit voter cards. in afghanistan people are worried they can be used in upcoming presidential elections. al jazeera travelled in the east, where the cards were on sale for $5-$10. they can be used to cast a vote. you can bias many as you
in ransom money. a study by the u.n. and the world bank says the piracy cost the global economy $18 billion. pirates use the money to pay for crime, including human and weapons trafficking and funding militias. >> the immediate closure of a mine in a town after 92 people women and children died of thirst trying to cross the sahara desert. traffickers who transport people through niger will be severely punished. >> an unofficial referendum to decide the future of abeyei has done little to clarify the position of the region. sudan and south sudan has claims on the oil-rich territory. 99.4% of people - mainly from the ngok dinka tribe voted in favour of joining the south. a rival group boycotted the vote. the result is not recognised by either government. al jazeera's peter greste reports on the difficulties of running abeyei. >>. >> number four, you have recognition which is important. ... >> this is abeyei's new state government. a local committee meeting under a tree. these are the people who organised the unofficial referendum among the ngok dinka. they voted 99.9% to reject sudan, and ins
sides of the border. >>> now asking the u.n. to adopt a resolution to end mass electronic spies. the move comes on the sp the allegations of spying on both sides. the act is expected to be voted on later this month. meanwhile, edward snowdon is reaching out to berlin. >> edward snowdon shows every sign of going native. enjoying a river cruise in moscow. but on thursday he held a three-hour meeting with an mp from the german green party who said their discussions were very revealing. at a press conference friday the mp said snowdon would be willing to come to germany as a witness in any inquiry in the u.s. bugging the phone of chancellor angela merkel. >> he told me he could imagine come to go to germany if it means coming in safety. this means free passage and receiving asylum. the interior minister could help him. >> reporter: snowdon starts his new job in petersburg as a technical adviser with russia's version of facebook, but he may not be happy as they have been given new powers of intercepting of communication. >> it was a warm meeting he would at snowdon's initiative. >> r
for a year, and has been taken by the army a few days ago. on the u.n. side we are forming a team which will investigate. and from the results we'll tell you what was discovered. >> the government is investigating two. war crimes are common. the full story may never be uncovered. >> in northern yemen 58 people died in violent clashes between shia and sunni muslim groups. it began in the damaj province. fighting cast a shadow over reconciliation process. >> the leaders of serbia and kosovo are coming together hoping to bridge ethnic divisions during an election. not everyone is on board with the idea. >> for the people of kosovo, casting a ballot represents more than determining a winner. it's the first time polls covering the territory of kosovo has been organised by the government. serbia backed the vote, hoping it will smoth their path to the i -- smooth their path to the e.u. membership. in the southern part of the city, an influx of people entered a polling station to vote on who would be the next mayor. >> translation: these elections are important for kosovo. europe is asking for
to erect that statue for eight years. >> allegations against the n.s.a., involving spying an u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon. the "new york times" says talking points for moonwere intercepted prior to a visit with president obama. the disclosure as considered an operational high light in a top-secret report. the white house is not commenting on the article. an end to the surveillance has been ordered. >> murder charges has been made against paul ciancia, the man that opened fire in terminal 3. more details emerged after the shating leaving one t.s.a. dead and others injured. brian rooney has more from lax. >> the suspect paul ciancia is unresponsive and unable to talk, according to the fbi. paul ciancia was wounded in the face by police officers at the end of friday's gun battle inside lax terminal 3. a neat inside paul ciancia's bag gave insight into his frame of mind. >> he made a conscious decision to kill multiple t.s.a. employees. he addressed them at one point in the letter and state that he wanted to "instill fear into their traitorous minds." the fbi says paul ciancia shot t.s.a
for nothing and they would east aret people and make them disappear. >> the world's largest u.n. peace keeping force in congo have been helping the government fight m-23. the government has not stopped the atrocitieses in the 14 years they have been here, but they say they'll foun find out what happened. >> we all know that bodies have been found in that area. the area had been controlled by m-23 for one year and had been taken by the army a few days ago. we are quickly forming a team that is going to investigate and from the results we'll tell you what was discovered. the government says it's investigating too. but the war crimes are common in congo conflict. and the full story may never be uncovered. malcolm webb in the democratic republic of congo. >>> the fighting began last wednesday in yemen. renewed fighting has cast a shadow over rec conso man reconn efforts. >> murder charges have been filed against paul ciancia the man that opened fire inside of s angeles international airport. officals say the shooter was clearly inten intent on taking s rage on tsn agentses. >> the suspect paul cia
to an end. they have made their pleasure known. one by not taking one of the non-permanent seats on the u.n. security council and by deciding not to take part in the certainn diplomatic or military exercises with ou the u.s. this is a chance for the saudis to express their concerns to kerry and also about iran. iran is trying t to assume a greater roll in international politics. >> kerry has to listen to their concerns and try to placate them as best he can. >> pictures of mohammad morsi have come out for the first time since he was do pose deposed. morsi is to stand trial tomorrow for charges of insighting murder and violence. egyptians moved the location of the trial today to avoid a mass rally. >> earlier i spoke to a middle east analyst who said kerry's influence in egypt may be limited. well the road map that was put in place by the transitional government does lead to a democratically elected new government that is expected to happen over the next several months. so as we move along the map, we are headed toward democracy at least electoral democracy. what actually happens in terms of
.k. and northern europe. >> mission diplomacy, the u.n. envoy arrives in damascus. about to urge everyone to peace talks. >>> find out why demonstrators in turk yi turkey are so angry. >>> welcome to the show. the white house says it's reviewing the way it gathers intelligence. it's considering putting additional constraints on its agencies, the announcement follows pressure from spain, france and germany after reports the u.s. spied on millions of their citizens. we can go straight now to washington, d.c, how seriously should we be thaig these comments from the -- taking these colts from the white house? >> as often is the case in the u.s., the min main issue is the bugging of world leaders, not the rest of us in the world. they pretty much take on as read that the u.s. can do whatever it wants. there are constitutional protections for international citizens, only for u.s. dissention, although of course there are problems with that. jay carney the white house press secretary says as far as angela merkel, the white house didn't know about angela merkel's bugging until this summer and he put a stop
people and make them disappear. >> reporter: the world's largest u.n. peace keeping forces in congo is helping them fight m-23 and we can't stop it in the 14 years it has been here but say they will find out what happened. >> translator: we all know that bodies have been found in that area. the area has been controlled by m-23 for about one year and that it has been taken by the army just a few days ago. on the u.n. side we quickly form a team which is going to investigate and from the results we are going to tell you what has been discovered. >> reporter: they are investigating two but war crimes are common in the conflicts and the full story may never be uncovered, webb in the district of congo. >> reporter: these interest numbers of congo and huge a population of under 68 million people. life expectancy is low. the average life span is only 48 years. it's also a poor country. 87.7% of the population lives below the poverty line. the bodies of two french journalists killed in mali have been repatriated and they were obducted and murdered in saturday in northern mali and bodies
talks. the u.s. and n.a.t.o. troops withdraw from afghanistan next year. this is the fourth such meeting designed to bring stability to the region. >>> the syrian government said it will be attending the proposed two-peace conference meanwhile the hundreds fled the violence as the violence continues. >> reporter: spending a second day in damascus. the geneva two peace conference was thrown into doubt last week when rebel groups not only vowed to boycott it but to attack any who decide to attend. >> we are preparing for geneva two peace talks, and it will be the syrian parties who will decide the transitional period and what follows the transitional period. >> reporter: state television announced that brahini was told that the bashar al-assad government would be attending. but those in defiance said no negotiations will take place unless assad steps down first. >>> meanwhile on the ground the continued fighting is forcing more and more families to flee. close to the capital, hundreds of people picked up belongings they could and took off in foot in search of a place, any place that might
officials from getting a controversial wire tapping program re-authorized. >>> the u.n. special envoy to syria is back in damascus on its latest raft of shuttle did moment see, trying to bring together outside in the conflict for peace talks in geneva rob matheson has the story. >> reporter: once more he faces what many would call a near impossible task. a return to damascus try to muster any enthusiasm for finding a way out of syria's crisis. it's not just a matter of getting two sides to the table. before that he has to try to knit together a fractured rebel opposition, much of which doesn't even wants to be involved. >> the intimate national community wants to support the syrian regime in geneva too. they don't want to weaken them really. that's why we completely reject this conference. when it leads to a court for the crimes of assad then we will negotiate. but first there has to be real and effective statement on this. in the absence of political solution, the military solution is the only one on the table. >> reporter: else ielsewhere ina the deadline for di destroying chemical
cases 12 many are now being investigated. most of those people being tested are babies. last week the u.n. launch add campaign to immunize nearly 2.5 million children against polio and other diseases. with thousands of refugees fleeing every day, they are also stepping up imization efforts in six neighboring countries. a top syrian official was fired today, reports claim that he was let go after meeting with american officials over the weekend in geneva. syria saying the deputy prime minister was let go because he failed to do his job. russia, beginning the symbolic count down today to welcome the world to the 2014 winter olympics. it is now just 100 days until the games kick off in seven hi. david is there where preparations are now in full swing. i think the best way to describe the mood here, is one of high anxiety. top of the list of the worries must be security. there's been a ten year rebellion in the republic in the south by the caspian sea. now they managed to get a bond through in the south of russia. now it is a lot further away from where that fighting is going on. we are prett
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